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Transcript with synopsis

Full transcript of the film begins after the synopsis of the last section on "Shout Bands". Numbers indicate time code (minutes: seconds).

R & B VOCAL GROUPS

01:39
Synopsis: Spotlighting the Orioles, this section opens with the group discussing the group’s history, its formation by Sonny Til, the development of r & b vocal groups, and rehearsing of “Crying in the Chapel.” The mention the importance of gospel quartets and the informal nature of early vocal harmony singing. It includes a live performance at a local club with audience interviews and a performance of “I Just Got To Know.” They mention clubs such You Can’t Find Us, Wilmer’s Park and other venues. The importance of “Where Ever You Go” and Skip Mahoney in the 1970s and stage presence in general is discussed.

GO GO

12:44
Synopsis: Honing in on the importance of Junkyard Band, which emerged in the mid 1980s, this section intersperses live performances by the Band with in-person interviews. Andre Parker (Junkyard drummer), Steven “Bugs” Herrion (Junkyard vocalist and leader), Daniel Baker, Warren Weems, (two other Junkyard members) along with Rapper D playing drums in Freedom Square, in front of the White House are among those interviewed. The selections include “Come On Down to See Junkyard” (the band’s theme song) and “Hee Haw.” Ken Moore, a poster collector and go go club entrepreneur (with the Black Hole) is interviewed about the role played by posters and p.a. tapes. The improvisational and lively nature of a live go go performance is spotlighted at the end of this section.


GOSPEL QUARTETS

25:55
Synopsis Commonly referred to as “Jubilee,” this section focuses on the role played by the Four Echoes in preserving and documenting the genre. The songs include “My God Called This Morning” and “Twelve Gates to the City.” The interviewees include long time member Deacon William Evans recalling how the Four Echoes began just after the close of World War II when they were all working at Union (train) Station John Byrdsol, gospel music broadcaster over WUST-AM discusses the role played by the Four Echoes in the D.C. scene since World War II. The next segment shows the group broadcasting on WUST-AM and how community businesses such as a local shoe shine stand and a funeral parlor support the show. The final section documents the interaction between the Four Echoes and a female group, The Stars of Hope, with whom the Four Echoes are sharing their experiences singing sacred vocal harmony. Evens closes the film with an explanation of the mechanics of four part harmony singing and suggestion that “jubilee [singing] will stand.” .

SHOUT BANDS

36:09
Synopsis: An interview with Apostle Herbert Whitner opens the longest section of “Music District” (nearly 15 minutes), with some background about the history and development of the United House of Prayer for All People. He emphasizes the importance of music and spontaneous movement (dance) that are engendered by the Holy Ghost spiritual movement that permeates the services at the “House of Prayer.” D.C.-based trombonist Norvus “Butch Littlejohn” Miller discusses his own history as well as the relationship between secular musical forms and the music heard in his Church. Whitner then comments upon the relationship between a successful service and the spiritually uplifting music. The film also captures part of the “Leaders of Legend” service featuring Eddie Babb (Sons of Thunder–NYC) Legends of Leaders, George Holland (Happyland Band–Newport News, Va). along with Miller. Norvus G. Miller, son of the famed trombonist, is interviewed about his father, who died before the film was complete. This section closes with scenes from Miller’s funeral. The musical selections includes “Just a Little Closer Walk with Thee”

TRANSCRIPTION BEGINS

00:01
SHOTS OF WASHINGTON, D.C.

Music bed: The Four Echoes

Twelve Gates to the City (I, John)
Oh, way back yonder in the days of old,
John saw a city made of gold.
It was a beautiful city, with pearly gates,
I said ol' John looked around, began to relate.
There were three gates in the East.
Great God, and there were,
Three gates in the West.
Hallelujah, there were,
Three gates in the North.
God knows and,
Three gates in the South.

00:34
Music bed: Kings of Harmony

Trombone shout band instrumental

01:01
Music bed: Junk Yard Band
Dedication call-and-response
We're gonna get on down with my main man Boo Boo.
It's a video, y'all.

01:21
TITLE AND HEAD CREDITS
Junk Yard Band (continued)

01:39
ORIOLES SEGMENT

ORIOLES' LEAD SINGER, ALBERT “DIZ” RUSSELL'S BASEMENT

Crying in the Chapel
(Sung accappella by The Orioles)
You saw me crying in the chapel,
But my tears were tears of joy.
I know the meaning of contentment.
I am happy with the Lord.

2:10
INTERTITLE: RHYTHM & BLUES QUARTET

Crying in the Chapel (continued)
Just a plain and simple chapel,
Where all good people come to pray,
02:30
Music bed: Sonny Til and the Orioles
Crying in the Chapel

Diz Russell: The Orioles is a vocal group that was created around 1948. This group was a bunch of young guys that came out of Baltimore. They were the beginning of groups long before the Flamingos, the Drifters, the Cadillacs, the Moonglows. They set the pace for all groups to follow. The lead singer was Sonny Til. He had a golden voice that nobody, in my estimation could duplicate. He was the start of what they would call rhythm and blues singing for vocal groups.

03:23
DIZ RUSSELL'S BASEMENT

Crying in the Chapel
(Orioles rehearse Accappella)
You'll search and you'll search, but you'll never find,

03:33
Diz Russell: A great deal of us sang in the choirs. In the wintertime, when it was too cold, we'd rehearse in automobiles. We'd rehearse in the YMCA. We'd rehearse in the showers in the men's room, for the acoustics, because it would make your voice sound big, you know. And that's how these groups came about.

03:55
GEE'S 4400 CLUB RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE

Diz Russell: This is the third generation of Orioles. And all of the original members are dead and gone, but we dedicate every show to these guys. They started; we're carrying on as best as we can.

04:11
Too Soon To Know
(Orioles play at the club)
Though I'll cry, when she's gone,
I won't die, no I'm gonna live on.
Is it so?
Well, it's too soon, way too soon,

04:41
Female fan: There's something about the Orioles, their manner, the control on stage, that is so different.

04:50
Too Soon To Know (continued)
To know.
I've just got to know.


Applause
05: 21
Club owner, Gee: Our club is like a party, but it's like a house party, rather than going into a club-club. You come in and if it's not right, we'll make it right.

05:32
Female fan: When I come into the clubs or the shows and hear music of yesterday, all of the problems and the sorrows and everything that's out in the streets, it's erased. For those couple of hours, you know, you just get a chance to really live again.

05:53
CLUB, THEN DIZ RUSSELL'S BASEMENT
Diz Russell: During the 50s and late 40s - I call it the heyday - nightclubs were very plentiful. They had them everywhere. As a matter of fact, this area in particular was sort of like an enterprise zone. We had Pat and Gigi's, Wilmer's Park. They had one around here that was called, You Can't Find It. We used to have to have somebody to meet us in Washington to take us to the You Can't Find It. Other than that, we would've never found out where it was.

06:23
GEE'S 4400 CLUB

Your So Fine
You're so fine.
You're so fine.
So fine, yeah, honey you're mine.
But I walk, I talk about you.

06:45
Diz Russell: I believe that a group can last forever. The name, the image of that group, it can last forever, just like a baseball team. No member will live forever. Several years from now, there'll probably be another stage of the Orioles, and on and on and on.

07:04
Wherever You Go
(Lead singer: Skip Mahoney)
Wherever you go, I will follow.
You can't leave me now.
And if you leave me,

Diz Russell: Skip Mahoney's song is a by-product of the 70s generation

CLUB
Wherever You Go (continued)
I will follow.
You can't leave me now.

Diz Russell: This song is Wherever You Go, which was quite a hit in the 70s, and we have moved our harmonies patterns right up with his.

Wherever You Go (continued)
Do do do do
Is just for you, baby, you alone.
Wherever you go, Lord knows I'll follow.
You can't leave me, you can't leave me now.

08:06
Skip Mahoney: The one thing that I learned from working with these guys is composure. They could just stand there and do this (snaps his finger) and it would look so cool. And I'm saying, “Well how do I do that?” So, I got it by the way now. I come right in there with them, you know. Just stand there and click your fingers, you know, and it looks just like, yeah, you know, “We got it baby”, you know. Okay, so, I got it now.

Band members laugh

08:29
GEE'S CLUB

Wherever You Go (continued)
Wherever you go, whatever you do, do, do.
Oh, wherever you go, I will follow.
You can't leave me now.

If you leave me, I will follow.
You can't leave me now

09:24
Mildred Russell: Sometime ago we came up with the motto, we advertise “45 years of music in 45 minutes”. And that means that we are going to entertain you even if you are a roach. You're gonna, you're gonna enjoy it.

09:41
Diz Russell: I try to make our show a history lesson and that's where I create the interest. And then for those of the audience that remember the songs, it's like selling them a memory.

10:01
GEE'S

Diz Russell: I couldn't leave the stage without doing this: the greatest tune recorded in Oriole history. We did it in 1953. Mr. Elvis Presley did it in 1956. From the movie American Graffiti, ladies and gentlemen, Crying in the Chapel.

10:19
Gee: When you put on an Orioles record, you know where you are: you're in your memory.






10:23
Crying in the Chapel
You'll search and you'll search,
But you'll never find,
Nowhere on earth to find peace of mind.
Take your troubles to the chapel.
Get down on your knees and pray.
And your burden will be lighter,
And you'll surely find a way.

You'll search and you'll search,
But you'll never find,
Nowhere on earth to find peace of mind.
Take your troubles to the chapel.
Get down on your knees and pray.
And your burden will be lighter,
And you'll surely find,
Diz Russell: Say it again
And you'll surely find,
Diz Russell: Again and again.

12:01
BASEMENT

Crying in the Chapel
(accappella from beginning of this segment)

(falsetto) And you'll surely find a, a way, a way.

12:33
Laugther
Skip Mahoney: Where'd you, where'd you, you ought to put that note in there all the time.
Diz Russell: (whistles) That's a nice note. I heard it.

12: 44
JUNK YARD BAND SEGMENT

EXTERIOR SHOTS OF GO-GO CLUBS and INTERTITLE: GO-GO

Music bed: go-go instrumental performed by Junk Yard Band

13:13
INSIDE KEN MOORE “THE POSTER KING”'s VAN

Ken: Adrian hit that pole right there.

(sounds of staple gunning posters to phone poles)



Music bed: Take Me Out to See Junk Yard
We're gonna take a picture of y'all doing your thing.
Take a picture of you doing your thing.

13:40
Take Me Out to See Junk Yard (continued)
Here we go, get with it.
Take me on out to see Junk Yard.
(vocalizing and unknown lyrics)
Bringing you these funky sounds.
Everybody loves to get down.

14:02
Filmmaker Susan Levitas: How do you think it got the name Go-Go?
Jason Lane: 'Cuz the beat, the drive. It goes on and on. It's like go, go, go, go, go, go. It's just go-go. It keeps going on. (laughter)

14:14
Instrumental

14:32
Carl “C.J.” Jones: It's non-stop. You go to a go-go. It's like, you know, going to hear other groups, some groups stop between songs. Go-go, hey, you never get off that dance floor. So, if you've got arthritis, you better put that Flex-All 54 on. (Laughs) Don't come to a go-go, 'cuz it's dangerous.

14:49
Instrumental

15:18
Andre Parker: A lot of people don't understand go-go music, 'cuz they might hear it on the tape and they don't know what it's about. But, once you come to the performance, then that's where all the energy comes. It's a call-and-response. The whole show involves the crowd. If it ain't no crowd, we might as well not even play.

15:34
Let's Hold 'Em
(call and response)
Let's hold 'em. (singer)
Wait a minute 41. (audience member)
Well, let's hold 'em (singer)
GW, wait a minute (audience member)
Well, let's hold 'em (singer)
(inaudible)
Well, let's hold 'em (singer)
41, wait a minute

Hey, well lookie here, hey, (transition to next call and response)


15:46
All the Ugly People in the House Be Quiet
I want all the ugly people in this house be quiet.
(Audience screams)
Thank you Brian. I said,
All the ugly people in this house be quiet.
(Audience screams)
All the ugly people in this house be quiet.
(Audience screams)
GW, GW, GW (audience member)
All the ugly people in this house be quiet
BET (audience member)

16:08
Steven “Bugs” Herrion: We can live without the call and response, but sooner or later, the crowd's going get into it, and want to say something. That's just the energy that comes from them. They wanna say, “Oh say my name. Say my name. Put me on display.” People love to, you know, be known, you see. Let the crowd know they in the house, you know. “I'm over here”. So, that's going automatically come.

16:23
I Got That Feeling
Junk Yard is in the house and getting ready to roll.
Lay it down. Let me hear you now.
41, 41 (audience member)
I got that feeling, yeah, that 25 feeling, 25 is in the house and we're
ready to roll (audience member)
Nah nah nah nah nah, let me hear you. (band)
I got the feeling, yeah, that District Heights feeling, District Heights is in the house and we're
ready to roll. (audience member)
Nah nah nah nah nah nah let me hear you. (band)

16:49
Jason Lane: The difference between rap and go-go is, go-go deals with a lot of display, meaning calling out people's names and streets and areas, neighborhoods. And rap, a rap song is dealing with a subject itself.

17:03
Call and Response
Also, we're gonna get on down with my main man Greg.
He's up in here shining a little bit.
41, 'bout six of 'em here.
Landover honeys down front.
Big Nat and my man Do Dirty in the Back.
Wait a minute.




17:21
Bugs: Okay, we got T Street. 305. Some, some they go this (makes an A with his hands). This is, this is Alabama Avenue, shaped like a A. They be like, something like that, you know. Some just be putting their hands in the air. Just, just a whole lot of little hand things that I just can't keep up with. But sometimes I try to keep up with it, though.

17:45
Transitional music
Let's get this show on the road early, man.
Let's get this show on the road early.
Wait a minute, we going get to you.
Just gonna video a little bit.
We gonna take a picture of y'all doing your thing.

18:02
Daniel Baker: Okay, we started off, when we was young - little boys. We didn't have nothin' to do. So, we went around in the bushes and the woods finding buckets and cans and, you know, we started a - huh? (looks down at band member, Bugs, talking over him).
Bugs: Put our imagination to it.
Daniel: Yeah, put our imagination to it and got, you know, the Junk Yard Band going.

18:22
STREET
(Rapper D tests out plastic buckets for pitch)
Sings and drums the buckets
Let me warm it up
Picking out a rhythm, that's something that I do.

18:58
Rapper D: There was always junk yard bands in Southeast, but there was only one junk yard that made it. And that was the original Junk Yard, you know, and, God bless his soul and I hope he rest in heaven, one of the drummers for the original Junk Yard, the Heavy One.

19:13
CLUB
Free Your Soul
(features Willie “Heavy One” Gaston on drums)
Well let's elevate your mind,
Free your soul

19:25
Andre Parker He's the only drummer, when I was playing with other bands that acknowledged the fact that I could play. I mean, acknowledged it to me. He'd come to me and be like, “I like that, man. You stay with it.” He influenced me; he gave me that drive. That made me really want to be in this band. I knew one day I was going be here. I didn't know how; I didn't know when, but I feel as though, if anybody is supposed to take his place it's me. And I'm gonna carry it like that and I ain't going let him down 'cuz I know he's watching.

Bugs: Amen
19:58
Warren Weems: The future starts here with us. Like, like, you was asking about uh, you know, how we carry ourselves when we go to the show. It's just a professionalism that, when you take there, you just have to show them that it's not all about violence, that, you know, if you have the talent or the ability to do anything that you should try to go further on with it, instead of, you know, letting the streets hold you back. Because it's not the streets that's holding you back; it's yourself. And we're trying to project that and show them that, that people can come together and do things together without violence

20:28
Music bed under images of posters:
Let Us Get On Down
Ba, ba, ba, ba.
Big J and them happening here.
Ba, ba, ba, ba
And - POW!
Waitin' on you partner

20:47
Ken Moore, “The Poster King”: These days, everybody belongs to a crew. Don't mistake it with a gang. It's a crew. It's just some guys that live in the same neighborhood; they hang together. They all wear the same type of hats that'll say “New Project” or “Seven Woods” or “25 Hour Store” and what you have to find out is, where are these crews?

21:10
Music bed under images of posters:
Let Us Get On Down (continued)
We just love to funk, funk
We just love to (inaudible)

21:17
Ken Moore: Every band does not have the same crews.

21:19
Music bed under images of posters:
Let Us Get On Down (continued)
Let us get on down.
We just love to funk, funk

21:23
Ken Moore: A lot of the go-go kids, they don't always listen to the radio. What do they have: They have the p.a. tapes that they buy when they come to the shows. So, they're riding around in their cars listening to their favorite group. So, so they need the posters, the visual contact.







21:43
INSIDE KEN MOORE “THE POSTER KING”'s VAN

Ken: The difference between the Washington monuments and the Washington that we're riding in right now is the police. If they catch defacing Washington property, you will spend the night in Capitol Hill jail. Yes you will. Yes you will. Where they feel a poster is trash versus where I feel it's an art.

22:23
CLUB
Bugs: Awright, who's first to be on t.v.? Who's first to be on t.v.? You ready Rambo. This can make you famous.

22:33
Hee Haw
Bah bah bah bah bah bah bah bah bah
You got it.
Bah bah bah dah dah dah bah bah dah dah
It's the Hee Haw, y'all.
Bah bah bah dah dah dah bah bah dah dah
Hee Haw
Bah bah bah dah dah dah bah bah dah dah
Awright, put in the funky hoedown
Put in the funky hoedown
Well let's crank this sucker up.
Awright, in the camera
Ah, that video camera.
Oh, wait a minute.
Awright Rambo

23:23
Bugs: The Hee Haw was invented back in '89. Okay, I was on the football team back then. Okay, I scored a touchdown and, you know, the end zone celebration, right? It was like, hey, (gestures with hands to indicate dance moves) and I was like doing that - Hee Haw, Hee Haw. So, that night we had to play and I was like, you know, just moving, you know, doing this to myself. The next thing you know I just got on the mic, “The Hee Haw, the Hee Haw.” Then I just started calling my little cousin, “Little Rob, the Hee Haw.” Next thing you know they come with some music behind there. Then, the next thing you know, that's how that was invented.

23:54
CLUB
Hee Haw (continued)
You got it.
Bah bah bah dah dah dah bah bah dah dah
Put in the funky breakdown.
Well, let's crank this sucker up.



24:10
Female fan 1: It's crazy. It's -
Female fan 2: I think it's for boys.
Female fan 1: Yeah
Female fan 2: I can't see girls doing that.
Female fan 1: I don't see wom-I don't see girls do that.
Female fan 2: Jumping around, sweating and all.
Female fan 1: Yeah, acting crazy

24:20
Hee Haw (continued)
Put in the funky breakdown.
Ewwwwwwwwww!
(Music: theme from The Adaams Family)
Ha ha ha!

24:43
Band member: The crowd and the band, we boo 'em and they give a little, you know, a little, you know, a little exit music, right.
Warren Weems: Tell 'em don't come back. Tell 'em get out; embarrass them. Go on about your business.
Band member: They can come back and try it the next show, right, if they're better, you know.
Bugs: When you get on stage, it's like, the Hee Haw, it's got to be full of energy and you've got to be doing it in rhythm and certain types-and sometimes you have your own thing that you'll do.

25:05
CLUB
Hee Haw (continued)
You got it.
Bah bah bah dah dah dah bah bah dah dah.
Put in the funky breakdown.
Put in the funky breakdown.
Well let's crank that sucker up.
Woo, Lord.
Oh wait a minute.
(Laughter)

Bugs: Anybody ready? You ready? You ready? You got it.

Hee Haw (continued)
Bah bah bah dah dah dah bah bah dah dah.







25:55
THE FOUR ECHOES SEGMENT

EXTERIOR SHOTS OF CHURCHES

Music bed: Great Getting Up Morning
Well in that great getting' up mornin',
Fare you well, fare you well.
Well in that great getting' up mornin',
Fare you well oh fare you well.
Hey in that great getting' up mornin',
Fare you well oh fare you well.
Well in that great getting' up mornin',
Fare you well oh fare you well.

26:14
INTERTITLE: JUBILEE

Great Getting Up Morning (continued)
Well I want you to go down yonder and blow it.
Blow until the people know it.
Blow one blast a-calm and easy,
Wake up the people that are down there sleeping

(audio dissolve into next song)

26:28
CHURCH

My God Called This Morning
Well my God called this morning,
Just a little while before day.
Well stop and listen what my God said to me.
He said, “If you want to make it in the kingdom,
You've got to fall on your bended knees”
Great God you know.
The prayer wheel, hey Lord, started turning and the spirit of God,
Set my soul a-jumping.
And the prayer wheel, hey Lord, a-turned over,
And a-moved a-one step near to Glory.
God rose up and shouted
Shouted
Lord God Almighty,
Hey, my God called this morning,
Just a little while before day.
Well stop and listen a-what my God said to me,
He said, “If you want to make it in the kingdom,
You've got to fall on your bended knees”
Great God you know,
The prayer wheel, hey Lord, started turning…
27:20
Male fan: When you hear The Four Echoes are coming, one gets a celebrated joy because we know that we're going to hear some of that traditional music.

Female fan 1: The Four Echoes are one of the groups that you could always listen to accappella.

Female fan 2: Even when you are burdened down a song like what The Four Echoes sing or The Southern Gospel Singers, it lifts you up and, you know, make you feel that you can make another step just a little further.

27:50
My God Called Me This Morning (continued)
Well I heard the demons screaming.
Hey, Lordie.
And I saw the sinner going under,
Just a little while before day.
Hey, my God called this morning.
Hey Lordie.
Well, my God called this morning,
Just a little while before day. (applause)

28:18
Deacon William Evans: When we Four Echoes got together, on one Tuesday, after all of us had been in the service in the World War II. And we was working together at the Union Station. And we all worked right together, and we four got together and each one started to hitting a note and that's when we said, “Boy let's get together”, you know. That's the way we did. And it was on a Tuesday when we got it together back in-be forty-eight years soon.

28:50
John Byrdsol: I've known The Four Echoes for over thirty, thirty-five, forty years or more. Uh, it is the, the way gospel used to be. 'Course, they added a guitar, but when we first started singing gospel, there was no music whatsoever, just plain, just plain. And it told a story.

29:14
Twelve Gates to the City (I, John)
Oh, way back yonder in the days of old,
John saw a city made of gold.
It was a beautiful city, with pearly gates,
I said ol' John looked around, began to relate.
There were three gates in the East.
Great God, and there were,
Three gates in the West.
Hallelujah, there were,
Three gates in the North.
God knows and,
Three gates in the South.
And that makes,
Twelve gates to the city
(Four squares wide?)
29:56
WUST AM RADIO STATION
D.J.: This is WUST 1120 on the AM side of your dial. It's 10 o'clock on Sunday morning.
Deacon Evans: (shakes hands and greets people in the radio studio). Hi young man

Music bed: I Want to be at the Meeting
I want to be at the meeting
I want to be at the meeting

D.J.: And now live from the studios of WUST, for the next fifteen minutes, it's The Four Echoes.

Deacon Evans: Good morning and tell the Lord, “Thank you.” It's a blessing to be here this morning. Thank God he have brought us a long-a mighty long ways here on this air. And thank Him for all our friends and things have been listening to us down through the years through WUST. We've been here for over forty some years and been enjoying the trip.

Someone in the studio: Amen

Deacon Evans: I want you to listen up the one that keep us on-been keeping us on the air for a long, long time, Johnson & Jenkins Funeral Home.

30:51
FUNERAL HOME
Joseph P. Jenkins, Jr.: I'm Joseph P. Jenkins, Jr. and I'm the president of Johnson & Jenkins Funeral Home. I've been supporting The Four Echoes for fifteen years.

31:01
WUST
Deacon Evans: Elder Long's Shoe Shop.

31:03
SHOE SHOP
Pastor B.L. Long: Uh, my name's Pastor B.L. Long, pastor of Baptized Believers' Church of Christ, owner of Long's Shoe Repair Shop. I have customers that come from Southeast, Northeast, Northwest, Southwest to bring work, so that means that means that The Four Echoes are singing where it's getting out into the community..

31:26
WUST
Deacon Evans: S&W Auto Sales

31:29
USED CAR LOT
Clarence Watts: My name is Clarence Watts. My business have boomed, pretty much so, since my name was advertising on the radio, very much.




31:39
WUST
Deacon Evans: They have some beautiful used cars. If you don't believe it, go by there and try it; you'll like it. All right, letting you know though about Carl Wilson's Grill. Been with us a mighty, mighty long time.

31:52
REHEARSAL WITH THE STARS OF HOPE
Linda Kelly sings: “Steal Away”
Deacon Evans: See you got to cut it.
Linda Kelly and Deacon Evan: “Steal away. Steal away to Jesus.”
Linda Kelly: “Jesus” (laughs)
Linda Kelly and Deacon Evans: “Steal away. Steal away home.”
Linda Kelly: (laughs) Oh I like that. Oh, I'm sorry. (laughs). Um, since The Stars of Hope has been singing for the twenty-three years that we've been singing and to come into a new style-it makes a difference. And, uh, Deacon Evans, I like all the funny looking-funny sounding things he be doing, so I be trying to do that. And so, I'm sure if I can get the jubilee and be able to make all those funny sounds that he does, it'd be, it'd be a credit to us.

32:49
Steal Away
Why don't you steal away?
Come on and steal away.
Children, steal away.
Steal away home.
Steal away.
Why don't you steal away?
Well, I ain't got long to stay here.

Deacon Evans (sings): “Here”

33:21
Rose Simenton: You know I find it difficult (laughter). Because he, he really stays on me. He said he wasn't easy, but uh-he talking about, “I'm kinda easy.” No he is not kinda easy. He's direct and straightforward and steps on you when you're wrong, but that's the only way, uh, that he can teach us jubilee. And I realize that jubilee is an art. It's an art to be able to sing jubilee and I also realize and know that, uh, The Four Echoes are the only ones that sings jubilee. And I wanted to be one of the-I wanted our group to be one of the first women groups to really sing jubilee. And we know in the end we will reign victory over jubilee.

Deacon Evans: Yeah, it will pay off.

Rose: Amen







34:08
CHURCH
Run on for a Long Time
You may run on for a long time.
Run on for a long time.
Run on for a long time.
Let me tell you God Almighty gonna cut you down.

Go tell that lonesome liar,
Go tell that midnight rider,
Yeah, the rambler, the gambler, the back biter,
Tell him God almighty gonna cut him down.

34:31
Deacon Evans: The best part in jubilee-that tenor is the sweetest part in singing. If that tenor's on time, and got that voice just right, he makes the music more mellow; it's more mellow. And the harmony's most beautiful. And after that tenor keeps his up there, 'cause the tenor stays just a little bit above the leader. And after the leader's-he's got his working, he ain't got to do a thing but ad lib. And, all right, then the tenor he keeps it moving. And the baritone, he walks in just as easy as somebody walking on-on cotton. Then, the base ain't done a thing but just sittin' back there enjoying the whole trip, but he's on time.

35:13
CHURCH
Run on for a Long Time (continued)
You're going to reap just what you sow.
You may run on for a long time.
Run on for a long time.
Run on for a long time,
Let me tell you God almighty's gonna cut you down.

Go tell that lonesome liar,
Go tell that midnight rider,
Yeah, the rambler, the gambler, the back biter,
Tell him God almighty gonna cut him down.

(Applause. Crowd leaving “good-night”)

35:48
Deacon Evans: Jubilee will stand. Just want someone to carry it on as we leave from this earth and leave from here. Pass on: you pass it on down to the other. It will stand.

36:09
KINGS OF HARMONY SEGMENT

CHURCH EXTERIORS and INTERTITLE: SHOUT BANDS
Music bed: Kings of Harmony



36:46
Apostle Herbert Whitner: This building is affectionately called “God's White House”. Bishop McCullough, who actually built this particular building, he said, with this being the nation's capital, he said, if the nation could have a White House, God certainly should have one. The United House of Prayer actually got started in the early 20s when Bishop Grace, or Daddy Grace, as he came to be known, came to this country from Portugal.

37:16
Bishop Daddy Grace (recording): Accept to be born of the water like I was and the spirit like I was.

37:26
Apostle Whitner: The first church was established in Wareham, Massachusetts which he built with his own hands.

37:34
Music bed: Old recording of Shout Band music for The United House of Prayer
Apostle Whitner: Music has always been a-a very intricate part of our organization. If you will look back, 150th Psalm, it tells us to praise the Lord with the brass instruments, with the trumpet, with the uh, string instruments, with the organ, with the high sounding cymbal. These are instruments that, uh, are know to exclaim or to-to-to sound a loud sound.

38:34
CHURCH
Kings of Harmony “thundering”, a musical and spiritual crescendo in the music.

39:04
Apostle Whitner: The sound is a sound that cannot be imitated. Once you've ever heard a band from the House of prayer, wherever you are, you know that sound.

39:14
CHURCH CAFETERIA
Norvus “Butch Littlejohn” Miller: I call it inspirational gospel and that, uh, it takes up, uh, a lot of the different lines. Uh, you know, I was speaking of the New Orleans jazz, and, uh, the, um, jazz period, and you're talking about the blues, little r&B, un, all of those, um-even a little country and western.

39:41
CHURCH
Kings of Harmony play

40:24
Apostle Whitner: The shout band tends to lend music for us to dance by. In other words, in that same Psalms, it says to praise the Lord in the dance. So, we believe in dancing and the shout band gives us that music to dance by.

40:45
Kings of Harmony play (song title) while people dance.


41:31
Apostle Whitner voice bed: Once that band gets started, things really happen. They play with a spirit-filled sound so, what they feel comes out of their instruments. And, uh, it uh, creates a spirit-filled night in our service.

42:02
Apostle Whitner: A good band can determine what type of service we have. Um, there've been Sundays that, uh, the band will perhaps play a tune prior to my delivering my Sunday message and it determines how much I will have to say or just what I will have to say, because a lot of times when the band gets finished, uh, things have escalated so spiritually until there's really not a lot for me to say.

42:35
Kings of Harmony play while people dance.

43:03
Norvus Miller voice bed, then on-camera: We as individuals have a spirit. To give you an example, you can watch a t.v. show and get caught up in this show and you could be in tears and you look around and you realize that you're in tears and you didn't really know that you had started crying until you really checked. And this is when that you were more or less out of self. You know, when you're in self, you're in full, uh, control of what you're doing and everything. So, uh, the music, uh, raises this spirit and causes you to have a good time.

43:45
Female congregation member 1: We live off of music like we live off of food. So, we-we-we thrive on music in the House of Prayer.

43:54
Female congregation member 2: Well I want to tell you something, as soon as I walk in the door and I hear the music it makes me want to start clapping my hands; it makes me want to start moving; it makes me feel real good.

44:09
Male congregation member: It goes deep, you know-you know. Once you hear a good choir or a good singer, it touches you for that little while. But then this keep on messing with you, you know. You-you just can't, uh, leave it alone. It just-you know you go home and all during the week you're hearing it.

44:27
CHURCH
Kings of Harmony playing while people record the music. Lead trombonists: George Holland, Happyland Band of Newport News, Virginia; Norvus Miller, Kings of Harmony; Eddie Babb, Sons of Thunder of New York City.

45:46
Norvus G. Miller. voice bed, then on camera: My father was music to me. I wanted to play like him; wanted to be like him. I lived with my own legend, you know, my own idol (laughs). I grew up with my own idol. So it was-it was a little awkward at times, you know, because he was my father and I found myself bragging a little bit on him, you know. They'd say, “Oh you just say that 'cuz that's your father.” And I'd say, “No, I say it 'cuz it's true.”
46:25
Norvus Miller (Sr.) featured on trombone.

47:11
Norvus G. Miller voice bed: He could do it all. He could scream like a trumpet. And then he could drop like a bass. The fast tonguing, all the-all the fancy stuff, he could do it.

47:33
CHURCH CAFETERIA
Norvus Miller (Sr.): Well, I started back, I guess I was about six years old and, uh, I blew pipes, you know the water pipes. My father had them water pipes. I put 'em all together, had the little fittings. And I started blowing in the pipes and I could develop a real good sound (laughs).

47:55
Norvus G. Miller: Even the little babies, can't even talk, you'll see 'em jumping around (imitates sound and gestures of babies blowing trombones)

48:02
Music bed for kid blowing toy horn and kids in congregation.

48:16
Norvus G. Miller: I guess I came up the same way, so I really can't say I remember where it started because I grew up in it, you know. Even as a little baby my mother would tell me how I would-how-I would grab a broomstick-she said I had to be about one or two years old-and I would grab a broomstick and I would rare back, just playing that, playing the horn, you know, and I was a baby.

48:47
Kings of Harmony play

48:53
Norvus G. Miller: I guess 'cuz I was his son and I ended up coming up in his footsteps-we play so much alike because we think so much alike. And he could just come out of the clear blue with something and when he would hit it I would hit the harmony to it.

49:32
FUNERAL
Norvus G. Miller plays solo at his father's funeral

Apostle Whitner voice bed: We have come this morning to pay our final respects on behalf of our deceased brother, Elder Norvus “Butch Littlejohn” Miller.

Norvus G. Miller and Kings of Harmony play

51:43
FUNERAL PROCESSION
Same song being played on the street


51:59
Norvus G. Miller voice bed, then on camera: I believe I'm going to see my father again when I get across on that other side. I'll see him again. So, that's-that's my goal right now. I'm going to play and, uh, serve the Lord and do what I'm supposed to do, 'cuz I know he's waiting on me; he's waiting, so I ain't going to let him down (chuckles). I'm not-I'm not saying I'm ready to go right now, but, you know, I'm gonna-I'll play until-play until I just can't play no more, so….

52:36
CHURCH
Music bed: Kings of Harmony

A pastor: Let the church say amen
Congregation: Amen
Pastor: Amen
Congregation: Amen
Pastor: Amen
Congregation: Amen
Pastor: Bow and whisper prayer before leaving. Shake hands in fellowship. Shake somebody's hand; shake somebody's hand tonight; shake somebody's hand; shake somebody's hand; shake somebody's hand

53:20
ORIOLES CLOSING SEGMENT

GEE'S 4400 CLUB
Stand By Me (instrumental)
(audience applauds)

54:03
JUNK YARD BAND CLOSING SEGMENT

REHEARSAL
Hee Haw
Bah bah bah dah dah dah bah bah dah dah.
Yeah.
Bah bah bah dah dah dah bah bah dah dah.
(inaudible)…loves to Hee Haw.
Bah bah bah dah dah dah bah bah dah dah.
(inaudible)…loves to Hee Haw.
Bah bah bah dah dah dah bah bah dah dah.
Put in the funky breakdown
Funky breakdown.
Funky breakdown






54:50
THE FOUR ECHOES CLOSING SEGMENT

CHURCH
I Want to be at the Meeting
I want to be at the meeting.
Don't you know now,
I want to be at the meeting.
Early, early one morning children,
I want to be at the meeting,
When all the saints get home
Lord, after separating, Lord, the right and the wrong,
I want to be at the meeting around the throne
(Applause)

55:48
Twelve Gates to the City (I, John)
Sung by The Four Echoes
(off screen)
Oh, way back yonder in the days of old,
John saw a city made of gold.
It was a beautiful city, with pearly gates,
I said ol' John looked around, began to relate.
There were three gates in the East.
Great God, and there were,
Three gates in the West.
Hallelujah, there were,
Three gates in the North.
God knows and,
Three gates in the South.
And that makes,
Twelve gates to the city
And it was, forty-eight angels to the city.
My, my it was,
A great, big, beautiful city
(four square wide?)
Halellujah.

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