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  • The Sheep Stew Of Dundas: A Gastronomical Delight

    <p>This journey in search of the story of Dundas Sheep Stew and its preparation is poignant as we learn how fragile the tradition is; and it is filled at every turn with good humor and the extraordinary warmth of the people of Dundas. This documentary provides an unusual view back into the ways of our rural farm folk who took occasional breaks from the gruelling work of farming to come together around the cooking of a locally concocted stew, to enjoy fun and fellowship; and for the stewmaster and stew crews, a sip of whiskey here and there, some good-natured leg-pulling, and the comradery of a rural farm culture that occured around the stew-pot - not to mention the good eatin' that followed.</p> <p>The citizens of Dundas raised $2,500 through a rummage sale, a raffle, and the cooking of a special sheep stew to enable the editing of this documentary to occur during the editing of Southern Stews.</p>

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  • It's Grits

    <p>With all the native wit, rib tickling humor and ability to see what makes the South the South found in the literary classics of Southern writers like Mark Twain, documentary filmmaker Stan Woodward helps us discover the common thread that connects the South’s people across all social, economic, political and racial boundaries – Grits! “Grits is us” - or, if we are to be grammatically correct, “Grits are us” - could easily be the title of this uproariously funny and at the same time insightful and poignant personal documentary.</p>

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  • Burgoo! Legendary Stew of the South

    <p>From pioneer days on the western frontier came a stew prepared by farmers and hunters by the name of Burgoo. No one knows where the name comes from, but one thing becomes very clear, the passion for whatever is called Burgoo, cooked in huge black iron cauldrons, is reflected in the titles given to the burgoo masters- they are called “Burgoo Kings!"</p>

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  • Barbecue & Home Cooking

    <p>The filmmaker is joined by SC folklorist, Saddler Taylor in this “road film” that travels a spontaneous investigating-and-recording-as-you-go journey through the farm roads and by-ways of four rural counties. There, homecooking and barbecue can be found, cooked by folk heritage culinary food artisans using ancestral recipes and methods that have been passed on to them by mothers cooking over wood-stoves and fathers cooking in BBQ pits dug in the ground.</p>

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  • Prairie Churches

    <p>Showcases the diverse history and architectural traditions represented by 117 churches throughout Manitoba, Saskatchewan, North Dakota and Minnesota.</p>

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  • Chuck Suchy: Sure Am Glad To Be Around

    <p>Chuck Suchy: Sure am Glad to be Around is an intimate portrait of iconic North Dakota musician Chuck Suchy. He talks about his creative process, the lessons he learned as an artist in residence in Iceland, the influences on his music, and the challenges that are taking him far from his ranch in western North Dakota at a time when most musicians would be thinking about retiring.</p>

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  • Smithy

    <p>Delbert Smith, 88, a hereditary blacksmith, illuminates life around the forge.</p>

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  • Watermen

    <p>In 1965 New York filmmaker Holly Fisher focused her camera on the annual skipjack race on the Chesapeake Bay, and on skipjack captain Art Daniels. Over the next three years, she and her co-director, Romas Slezas, filmed Daniels, his family and his colleagues oystering and crabbing and living on the Chesapeake. </p>

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  • Hazel Dickens: It's Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song

    <p>From the coalfields of West Virginia to the factories of Baltimore, Hazel Dickens has lived the songs she sings. Interviews with Hazel and fellow musicians such as Alison Krauss, Naomi Judd, and Dudley Connell are interwoven with archival footage, recent performances, and 16 songs including “Mama’s Hand,” “ Working Girl Blues,” and “Black Lung.”</p>

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  • Uncle Dave Macon

    <p>Uncle Dave Macon, also known as "The Dixie Dewdrop"—was an American old-time banjo player, singer, songwriter, and comedian. Known for his chin whiskers, plug hat, gold teeth, and gates-ajar collar, he gained regional fame as a vaudeville performer in the early 1920s before becoming the first star of the Grand Ole Opry in the latter half of the decade.</p>

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